Cheviot Hills

 

Situated within a short drive of both Fox Studios and Sony Pictures Studios, the neighborhood has often been the site for the filming of motion pictures and television shows. Examples dating to the 1920s and 1930s include the Laurel and Hardy films The Finishing TouchBig Business, and Bacon Grabbers, among others. Later examples include The Ropers television series from the late 1970s and the movie Private School in 1983. A house on Cheviot Drive was used in "The Flying Nun" starring Sally Field and a house on Glenbarr Avenue was the home of "Nanny and the Professor". On ABC-TV's "Modern Family" the exterior of a home on Dunleer Drive is seen as Claire and Phil Dunphy's residence.

Monte Mar Vista

Developed between 1926 and 1940, Monte Mar Vista is the most affluent part of Cheviot Hills. The neighborhood was originally developed by W.R. McConnell, Fred W. Forrester, and John P. Haynes and consists of sixteen blocks along the northern side of Cheviot Hills bound by the Hillcrest Country ClubCheviot Hills Park, and Rancho Park Golf Course to the north, west, and east and Lorenzo, Forrester, and Club Drive to the south. In 1928, the development was taken over by Ole Hanson and the Frank Meline Company, who continued to develop the neighborhood. Because of the area's location, many properties enjoy expansive views that overlook the Hillcrest Country Club and Rancho Park Golf Course as well as views of Century City, the Hollywood Hills, and the Hollywood Sign.  Many of the lots are large, often covering several parcels, and homes were designed by prominent architects including John L. DeLario, Roland E. Coartes, Wallace Neff, and Eugene R. Ward. The first house designed by Craig Ellwood, Lappin House, is located in this part of Cheviot Hills.

California Country Club Estates

Built in 1952 on the site of the former California Country Club, California Country Club Estates is a neighborhood of single-family homes that is known locally as New Cheviot, as opposed to the rest of Cheviot Hills which is known as Old Cheviot. The neighborhood is located within Cheviot Hills, bound to the north by Club Drive and to the west by Queensbury Drive, but has a separate home owner's association with binding CC&Rs attached to each lot, and its borders are marked by signs and central medians. The neighborhood was originally developed by Sanford Adler, the mob-backed owner of El Rancho Hotel and Casino, and included homes built by architects such as A. Quincy Jones.